Thursday, July 20, 2017

Raqs Sharki 1-2-3: Tito Seif - Time traveling with the stars of Egyptian Dance

Favourites of the Fourties/Fifties:
 Stars of the Sixties/Seventies:
 Modern Legends:

Part 14: Tito Seif (EG)

TITO SEIF is an internationally acclaimed male oriental dancer, instructor, choreographer and one of the world's top oriental artists. Born in Egypt in 1971, he started to dance at the age of 14 learning folklore and then oriental. 

Within a very short period of time he became one of the biggest names in the Oriental Dance and a prominent, innovative and mesmerizing dancer worldwide. Tito has been dancing for 28 years and he has been teaching for 18 years.

A prominent, technically proficient, innovative and mesmerizing belly dancer, he is recognized as a leader in the belly dance world. Tito's talents as an entertainer and a gifted prolific instructor are sought after all over the world. 
Source: AlAhram

Fotos:

 
 

About Tito:
Videos: Tito dancing with 4 sticks in Valencia, 2008
Tito performing 'drumsolo on a drum' with Issam Houshan at BDC, 2013
Tito at Stockholm BD Festival 2015
Tito workshop, 2015
Tito workshop, 2016

Enjoy!

See also: Raqs Sharki 1-2-3: Time Traveling with the Stars of Egyptian Dance
This workshop series by Khalida takes you on a journey in time with the great dancers of then and now.
  • Raqs sharki 1 – ‘Favorites of the fifties’ – Contains combinations and techniques inspired by the legendary dancers of Egypt like Samia Gamal, Naima Akef, Nadia Gamal and Taheya Carioca.
  • Raqs sharki 2 – ‘Stars of the seventies’ – Inspired by famous Egyptian dancers from the 60-80s like Suheir Zaki, Nagua Fouad and Fifi Abdo.
  • Raqs sharki 3 – ‘Modern legends’ – Contains informationa about, and techniques and combinations inspired by the famous dancers of this age
 From www.khalidadance.com/workshop-themes

Raqs Sharki 1-2-3: Randa Kamel - Time traveling with the stars of Egyptian Dance

Favourites of the Fourties/Fifties:
 Stars of the Sixties/Seventies:
 Modern Legends:

Part 13: Randa Kamel (EG)
RANDA KAMEL was born in Mansoura, Egypt. When she was a kid, she had many problems with her family because she used to dance in her friends and neighbours weddings and in scholar festivals. In that traditionalist city, her family disapproved her pleasure of dancing.

At the age of 15, she began studying egyptian folklore with the famous group Reda. She took part of it during 7 years. Nevertheless, she never attended to oriental dance courses, she always developed her own style.

After studying to be a psychologist (which is a discipline that helps her to be a dancer), Randa began her career as a professional dancer at the age of 21, in Alexandria. She lived there fore two years.
Afterwards, she moved on to El Cairo and worked in restaurants and cabarets during four months until she began to work in Meridien hotel. There, she shared the stage during a week with the famous dancer Fifi Abdou.

Randa danced as soloist in the hotel´s night show for two years, and later she began to work in Nile Maxim, a luxury cruiser that sails through the Nile river.

She likes working in El Cairo because she loves live music, but she also likes traveling and teaching oriental dance. “When I dance abroad, I feel as my country and my culture´s messenger”. She also tells us about the belly dance prejudices in her country that: “In Egypt, we believe that the oriental dance is a representation of the women’s beauty in order to seduce men. But I don’t agree with this. This is a millenary dance, and one of the most difficult ways of dancing. That’s why I don’t dance in a seductive way”.

About her own style, Randa says that she puts together ballet steps, the folklore style of Suheir Zaki or Samia Gamal and her own invention steps.

For her: “dance must be energy and power, constant movement. I don’t like soft movements. I like to show different expressions, feelings; every single part of my body must move. I want that anyone that looks at me, feels my movements. It’s the only way to catch the spectator’s attention, to surprise them”.

Even if she enjoys dancing baladi and modern oriental, her favourite music is Um Kulthum, because “everything in these songs is beautiful, the music, the lyrics; there are so many feelings that they catch my heart”

Sources:
About Randa Kamel (from TitoAlahramFestival.com)
Randa Kamel (by Yasmina for Gilded Serpent.com)

Fotos:
 
 
 
 
 


About Randa Kamel:
Videos:
Randa dacing to Al Eih Besalouni at Oriental Passion Festival, 2011
Randa Kamel at Esquisse d'Orient, 2011
Randa at Spirit of Cairo in, Berlin, 2014
Randa in Dubai, UAE festival, 2016
Tip: You can buy Randa Kamel's workshop/show music via randakamelmusic.com

Enjoy!

See also: Raqs Sharki 1-2-3: Time Traveling with the Stars of Egyptian Dance
This workshop series by Khalida takes you on a journey in time with the great dancers of then and now.
  • Raqs sharki 1 – ‘Favorites of the fifties’ – Contains combinations and techniques inspired by the legendary dancers of Egypt like Samia Gamal, Naima Akef, Nadia Gamal and Taheya Carioca.
  • Raqs sharki 2 – ‘Stars of the seventies’ – Inspired by famous Egyptian dancers from the 60-80s like Suheir Zaki, Nagua Fouad and Fifi Abdo.
  • Raqs sharki 3 – ‘Modern legends’ – Contains informationa about, and techniques and combinations inspired by the famous dancers of this age
 From www.khalidadance.com/workshop-themes

www.khalidadance.com

Raqs Sharki 1-2-3: Nesma - Time traveling with the stars of Egyptian Dance

Favourites of the Fourties/Fifties:
 Stars of the Sixties/Seventies:
 Modern Legends:

Part 12: Nesma Al-Andalus (ES)
NESMA lived in Cairo from 1993–1998, where she obtained her extensive knowledge of Oriental dance, Egyptian folklore, Arabic music, culture and traditions. During this time she performed as a soloist with her own orchestra in over 3,500 shows on the most prestigious stages of Cairo. She broadened her artistic career in the National Egyptian Folkloric Ballet, The Reda Troupe, becoming over the years one of Mahmoud Reda’s closest collaborators. 

Since 1998 she has danced and taught around the world. In Spain she founded her own school and a prestigious dance company, Al-Andalus Danza. She presented her shows in prestigious stages in Europe and at the Cairo Opera House, the Opera of Alexandria, and the Library of Alexandria in Egypt. Her early interest in creating shows inspired in the Spanish Moorish heritage made her a pioneer of Andalusian style dance.


Along with her dance company, Nesma has established a record company, Nesma Music, presenting a great line of authentic music and videos, and a major festival, Raks Madrid, which takes place yearly in July in the grand city of Madrid.


Photos
 
 

About Nesma:
Videos:
Nesma performing Wahashtini. Live band featuring Khamis Henkesh, Cairo 2011
GARIB AL DAR Nesma presents Mahmoud Reda choreographies, Madrid 2014
AL HAGALLAH, Nesma presents Mahmoud Reda choreographies, Madrid 2014
Nesma performing 'Enta Omri' (Om Kalsoum) at Raks Madrid, 2016
 
See more videos at Nesma's Productions youtube channel: www.youtube.com/channel/UCrD4QVydMgYKyuewedPMx5A 

Note: I've been lucky enough to take workshops with Nesma at several events, and she is one of the most inspiring artists I have met.

If you'd like to know more about Reda style, Andalusian dance, understanding Egyptian music and folklore, and/or working with live music and/or finding femininity and elegance in dance, I highly highly recommend her workshops, festival and formations.

Also be sure to check out her music CDs, which have beautiful full-orchestra arrangements of known and new songs.


Enjoy!

See also: Raqs Sharki 1-2-3: Time Traveling with the Stars of Egyptian Dance
This workshop series by Khalida takes you on a journey in time with the great dancers of then and now.
  • Raqs sharki 1 – ‘Favorites of the fifties’ – Contains combinations and techniques inspired by the legendary dancers of Egypt like Samia Gamal, Naima Akef, Nadia Gamal and Taheya Carioca.
  • Raqs sharki 2 – ‘Stars of the seventies’ – Inspired by famous Egyptian dancers from the 60-80s like Suheir Zaki, Nagua Fouad and Fifi Abdo.
  • Raqs sharki 3 – ‘Modern legends’ – Contains informationa about, and techniques and combinations inspired by the famous dancers of this age
 From www.khalidadance.com/workshop-themes

www.khalidadance.com


Thursday, July 6, 2017

Raqs Sharki 1-2-3: Fifi Abdo - Time traveling with the stars of Egyptian Dance

Favourites of the Fourties/Fifties:
 Stars of the Sixties/Seventies:
 Modern Legends:

Part 11: Fifi Abdo (born 1953)

FIFI ABDO was born in Cairo on April 26, 1953 and named Atiyat Abdul Fattah Ibrahim. Her father is a policeman and she has 11 siblings, including her famous brother Abdelraheem Abdul Fattah Ibrahim, who encouraged her career.

When she was 12 years old she joined a baladi troupe and later found work as a model. She began to gain attention in the early 1970s when she became the main attraction at the Arizona.

Over the years she danced at many other venues such as Le Meridien, Mena House and the El Gezira Sheraton. Her performances usually lasted around two hours and she received up to $10,000 per performance.

In addition to dancing, her routines often included circus tricks and even rapping. The Moroccan newspaper La Vie Eco reported in 2004 shortly before her retirement that she possessed 5,000 costumes with the most expensive being valued at $40,000

In her acting career, she is known as the woman-empowering type where, rarely in Egyptian culture and film, she beats up and overpowers men.
(Source: Wikipedia)


Fifi Abdo

 


About Fifi

Videoclips

Fifi's shimmy
Movie sequence
Fifi's baladi awad <3
Fifi performing with orchestra
Fifi's 'bedroom baladi' with assaya
Fifi at Mena House in Cairo (part 1)
Fifi at Mena House in Cairo (part 2)

Enjoy!


See also: Raqs Sharki 1-2-3: Time Traveling with the Stars of Egyptian Dance
This workshop series by Khalida takes you on a journey in time with the great dancers of then and now.
  • Raqs sharki 1 – ‘Favorites of the fifties’ – Contains combinations and techniques inspired by the legendary dancers of Egypt like Samia Gamal, Naima Akef, Nadia Gamal and Taheya Carioca.
  • Raqs sharki 2 – ‘Stars of the seventies’ – Inspired by famous Egyptian dancers from the 60-80s like Suheir Zaki, Nagua Fouad and Fifi Abdo.
  • Raqs sharki 3 – ‘Modern legends’ – Contains informationa about, and techniques and combinations inspired by the famous dancers of this age
 From www.khalidadance.com/workshop-themes

Raqs Sharki 1-2-3: Soheir Zaki - Time traveling with the stars of Egyptian Dance

Favourites of the Fourties/Fifties:
 Stars of the Sixties/Seventies:
 Modern Legends:

Part 10: Soheir Zaki (born 1944)

SOHEIR ZAKI was born in Mansoura in 1944. In 1953, when she was nine years old, she and her family moved to the Mediterranean city of Alexandria. Souhair Zaki fell in love with music and dance and showed natural talent, teaching herself to dance by listening to the radio.

Souhair Zaki was most inspired by the dances of Tahia Carioca and Samia Gamal. By the age of eleven she was being noticed at the birthday and wedding parties of friends and family, and started dancing professionally in the Greek nightclubs in Alexandria.

She is known for her elegant, natural style and exquisite musicality, even to this day. The 'Soheir Zaki hips' movement is named after her.

Music, such as “Shik Shak Shok”, was specially created for her every 6 months, and it is said she was the first dancer to perform to the music of Om Khalsoum (see a video of Soheir performing to 'Leylet Hob' below)

Sources:
About Soheir Zaki  (By Serpentine.org)
Suheir Zaki (the Belly Blog)
Sohair Zaki (Belly-Dance.org)

Soheir Zaki

 
About Soheir

Videoclips

Soheir in 'The price of love', 1964
Soheir in 'The River of Life', directed by Hassan Reda, 1965
Soheir dancing to 'Amal Hayati' in 'The foolish', 1966
Soheir dancing to Daret Al Ayam in 'Struggle With Death' , 1970
 Soheir dancing to 'Leilet Hob' in 'Nights that Will Never Return', 1974
Soheir dancing to 'Aghadan Alqak'
Soheir performing in Wakr al-ashrar (1972)
Soheir dancing to 'Hassan Ya Kholy El Genena' in the film 'Two women', 1975
Soheir dancing in 'Allo I'm the cat', 1975
Soheir dancing to 'Shik Shak Shok', 1979

Enjoy!


See also: Raqs Sharki 1-2-3: Time Traveling with the Stars of Egyptian Dance
This workshop series by Khalida takes you on a journey in time with the great dancers of then and now.
  • Raqs sharki 1 – ‘Favorites of the fifties’ – Contains combinations and techniques inspired by the legendary dancers of Egypt like Samia Gamal, Naima Akef, Nadia Gamal and Taheya Carioca.
  • Raqs sharki 2 – ‘Stars of the seventies’ – Inspired by famous Egyptian dancers from the 60-80s like Suheir Zaki, Nagua Fouad and Fifi Abdo.
  • Raqs sharki 3 – ‘Modern legends’ – Contains informationa about, and techniques and combinations inspired by the famous dancers of this age
 From www.khalidadance.com/workshop-themes

Raqs Sharki 1-2-3: Nagua Fouad - Time traveling with the stars of Egyptian Dance

Favourites of the Fourties/Fifties:
 Stars of the Sixties/Seventies:
 Modern Legends:

Part 9: Nagua Fouad (born 1936)

NAGWA FOUAD was born in Cairo, Egypt as Awatif Mohamed Agami to an Egyptian father and a Palestinian mother.

Nagwa performed at the Abdeen Casino where she met Ahmad Fouad Hassan (her future husband for 6 years), a producer of stage shows that later became a famous conductor. 

He convinced her to perform live at the most prestigious music and dance show in the 1960s called “Adwa al-Madeena i.e. City Lights” which had featured such superstars as Shadia, Abdul Haleem Haafez, Fayza Ahmad, and Sabaah. 

In 1976, the famous composer Mohammed Abdel Wahab wrote an entire musical piece exclusively for her belly dancing show titled “Aamar Arba'tashar i.e. Full moon” it was her transition from traditional oriental dance to a choreographed stage performances. 

Her stage performance to this special piece allowed her to change the way belly-dancing was presented on stage, transforming it from traditional oriental dance to more of a choreographed lavish spectacle adding more dramatic elements to it than ever before. 

Nagwa featured on many of the covers of the Ahmed Fouad Hassan LP's/CD's.
(Sources: Wikipedia, Elcinema.com)

Nagua Fouad



About Nagua
Videoclips

Nagwa dancing to 'Moghram Sababa' by Mohamed Roshdy

Nagwa performing in the movie 'Touha', directed by Hassan El-Seify, 1957
From the movie The Police Inspector 'Mufattish el mabahess', 1960
From Sab'el leil, directed by Hassan El-Seify, 1970
From 'Khamsa share' al-habaib', directed by El Sayed Bedeir, 1971
From 'No, You who Were my Beloved', by Helmy Rafl, 1976
Nagua dancing to 'Set El Hosen' - part 2



Enjoy!

See also: Raqs Sharki 1-2-3: Time Traveling with the Stars of Egyptian Dance
This workshop series by Khalida takes you on a journey in time with the great dancers of then and now.
  • Raqs sharki 1 – ‘Favorites of the fifties’ – Contains combinations and techniques inspired by the legendary dancers of Egypt like Samia Gamal, Naima Akef, Nadia Gamal and Taheya Carioca.
  • Raqs sharki 2 – ‘Stars of the seventies’ – Inspired by famous Egyptian dancers from the 60-80s like Suheir Zaki, Nagua Fouad and Fifi Abdo.
  • Raqs sharki 3 – ‘Modern legends’ – Contains informationa about, and techniques and combinations inspired by the famous dancers of this age
 From www.khalidadance.com/workshop-themes

Monday, July 3, 2017

Raqs Sharki 1-2-3: Mahmoud Reda & Farida Fahmy - Time traveling with the stars of Egyptian Dance

Favourites of the Fourties/Fifties:
 Stars of the Sixties/Seventies:
 Modern Legends:

Part 8: Mahmoud Reda & Farida Fahmy (Founders of the Reda Troupe)
MAHMOUD REDA, born in 1930, is a pioneer of dance theater in Egypt. He is best known for co-founding the Reda Troupe.

He was the eighth of ten children and his father was the head librarian at Cairo University. His older brother Ali was a dancer and through his influence (and that of Gene Kelly and Fred Astaire films) Mahmoud became interested in dance.

Mahmoud Reda originally trained as a gymnast, representing Egypt in the 1952 Summer Olympics in Helsinki. He attended Cairo University where he received a degree in Political Economics.

However, his main interest was dance and he joined an Argentinian dance troupe after graduating and toured Europe. While on tour in Paris he resolved to start his own dance troupe back in Egypt, but due to lack of funds he had to work as an accountant for Royal Dutch Shell.

He joined the Heliolido Club in Cairo where he met Anglo-Egyptian baladi dancer Farida Fahmy who became his dancing partner. After the two performed in the Soviet Union in 1957 they decided to start a folk dancing troupe in Egypt with Ali Reda.
(source: Wikipedia)

As a soloist, choreographer and director, Mahmoud Reda made four world tours to 58 countries with his troupe. He performed on the world's most prestigious stages such as Carnegie Hall (New York, USA), Royal Albert Hall (London, UK), Congress Hall (Berlin, Germany), Stanislavsky & Gorky Theaters (Moscow, USSR), Olympia (Paris, France) and the United Nations (New York & Geneva). The Reda Troupe has performed for many world leaders and Heads of states.

Mahmoud Reda draws from techniques of jazz, ballet, Hindu dance and folkloric dance from the USSR. His work has shaped and influenced what is known today as Oriental Dance (Raks Sharki). Many former troupe members include master teachers Raqia Hassan, Momo Kadous, Mo Geddawi and Yousry Sharif

(source: IMdB)

Fotos:

About Mahmoud Reda
Interviews with Mr. Reda:

Videos:
Farida Fahmi and Mahmoud Reda movie sequence:

Farida and Mahmoud:
Muhawashat - to Agaban Lel Gazal:
Reda Troupe - Egyptian folklore (Halawet Samsnenah)
Mahmoud Reda and Farida Fahmy - Workshop in Hungary, 2009:
Enjoy!

See also: Raqs Sharki 1-2-3: Time Traveling with the Stars of Egyptian Dance
This workshop series by Khalida takes you on a journey in time with the great dancers of then and now.
  • Raqs sharki 1 – ‘Favorites of the fifties’ – Contains combinations and techniques inspired by the legendary dancers of Egypt like Samia Gamal, Naima Akef, Nadia Gamal and Taheya Carioca.
  • Raqs sharki 2 – ‘Stars of the seventies’ – Inspired by famous Egyptian dancers from the 60-80s like Suheir Zaki, Nagua Fouad and Fifi Abdo.
  • Raqs sharki 3 – ‘Modern legends’ – Contains informationa about, and techniques and combinations inspired by the famous dancers of this age
 From www.khalidadance.com/workshop-themes

www.khalidadance.com


Sunday, July 2, 2017

Raqs Sharki 1-2-3: Zeinat Olwi - Time traveling with the stars of Egyptian Dance

Favourites of the Fourties/Fifties:
 Stars of the Sixties/Seventies:
 Modern Legends:

Part 7: Zeinat Olwy

ZEINAT OLWY, whose stage name was Zurah, (1930-1988) was one of the leading belly dancers in Egypt in the middle of the twentieth century. She appeared in many movies from the Egyptian Golden Age of cinema. One of her most famous performances was in Henry Barakat's 1955 movie Ayyam wa layali - Days and Nights
(Source: Wikipedia)


Fotos:
 
 
 

About Zeinat

Videos
Zeinat performing in Ayaam W Layaly, 1955


Enjoy!

See also: Raqs Sharki 1-2-3: Time Traveling with the Stars of Egyptian Dance
This workshop series by Khalida takes you on a journey in time with the great dancers of then and now.
  • Raqs sharki 1 – ‘Favorites of the fifties’ – Contains combinations and techniques inspired by the legendary dancers of Egypt like Samia Gamal, Naima Akef, Nadia Gamal and Taheya Carioca.
  • Raqs sharki 2 – ‘Stars of the seventies’ – Inspired by famous Egyptian dancers from the 60-80s like Suheir Zaki, Nagua Fouad and Fifi Abdo.
  • Raqs sharki 3 – ‘Modern legends’ – Contains informationa about, and techniques and combinations inspired by the famous dancers of this age
 From www.khalidadance.com/workshop-themes

www.khalidadance.com

Saturday, July 1, 2017

Raqs Sharki 1-2-3: Nadia Gamal - Time traveling with the stars of Egyptian Dance

Favourites of the Fourties/Fifties:
 Stars of the Sixties/Seventies:
 Modern Legends:
Part 6: Nadia Gamal

NADIA GAMAL, born to a Greek father and an Italian mother as Maria Carydias in Alexandria, Egypt, first began dancing as a part of her mother's cabaret act which performed at the Casino Opera in Cairo.

Trained in piano as well as several kinds of dance such as ballet and tap, Gamal initially performed European folk dances in her mother's act.

When she was 14, an ill dancer in her mother's troupe gave her the opportunity to dance raqs sharqi in Lebanon, which her father had forbidden her to do because of her youth. After this debut, she became a popular dancer and went on to star in many Egyptian films.

She is often credited as the originator of the modern style of Lebanese raqs sharqi.

(Source: Wikipedia)


Fotos



 



More about Nadia Gamal:
Videos:
Nadia Gamal performing in A Promise of Love, 1955
Nadia Gamal in Hindi movie Prem Pujari, 1970

Enjoy!

See also: Raqs Sharki 1-2-3: Time Traveling with the Stars of Egyptian Dance
This workshop series by Khalida takes you on a journey in time with the great dancers of then and now.
  • Raqs sharki 1 – ‘Favorites of the fifties’ – Contains combinations and techniques inspired by the legendary dancers of Egypt like Samia Gamal, Naima Akef, Nadia Gamal and Taheya Carioca.
  • Raqs sharki 2 – ‘Stars of the seventies’ – Inspired by famous Egyptian dancers from the 60-80s like Suheir Zaki, Nagua Fouad and Fifi Abdo.
  • Raqs sharki 3 – ‘Modern legends’ – Contains informationa about, and techniques and combinations inspired by the famous dancers of this age
 From www.khalidadance.com/workshop-themes